Perception of the Ethereum UX – MetaCartel – Medium

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3) Relative Preference

Goal: To understand the most important values for users and why those values matter to them.

Question 3: What bothers you the MOST?

3.1 Tech companies make millions from my personal data, I make zero (14.4%)
3.2 I feel unsafe using the Internet, online privacy is dead (8.1%)
3.3 Traditional banking and financial systems are broken — they’re unfair, disempowered and very dependent on corporates and governments (62.2%)
3.4 Online sources/data are not transparent and easily manipulated (14.4%)

Question 4: Why did you choose your first choice from that list? What does that mean to you?

Question 5: What bothers you the LEAST?

5.1 Tech companies make millions from my personal data, I make zero (33.3%)
5.2 I feel unsafe using the Internet, online privacy is dead (27.9%)
5.3 Traditional banking & financial systems are broken — they’re unfair, disempowered and very dependent on corporations & governments (15.3%)
5.4 Online sources/data are not transparent and easily manipulated (21.6%)

The utility scores calculated from the responses of Questions 3 and 5 are as follows (see Figure 1):

3.3 & 5.3
Traditional banking & financial systems are broken — they’re unfair, disempowered and very dependent on corporates & governments (0.468)

3.4 & 5.4 
Online sources/data are not transparent and easily manipulated (-0.072)

3.1 & 5.1 
Tech companies make millions from my personal data, I make zero (-0.189)

3.2 & 5.2 I feel unsafe using the Internet, online privacy is dead (-0.198)

Figure 1. Ethereum Users’ Personal Values

As Figure 1 shows, there is a clear trend that respondents were most dissatisfied with the current banking and financial system and least worried about their online privacy. These results were surprising, as it is most natural to think of decentralization as being spawned from the cyberpunk ethos and even more so that both movements, Ethereum decentralization and cyberpunk, have a shared vision of the future. In essence, cyberpunks believe in the right to privacy and use cryptography as a way to protect a violation of such right. In 1993, Eric Hughes published A Cyberpunk Manifesto, mentioning the term “privacy” 122 times in the first paragraph and referring to it heavily throughout the rest of the document.

Privacy is necessary for an open society in the electronic age.

Privacy is not secrecy.

A private matter is something one doesn’t want the whole world to know, but a secret matter is something one doesn’t want anybody to know. Privacy is the power to selectively reveal oneself to the world.[3]

For Question 4, a few responses stated that they believed a fairer financial system was the foundation of a better society and that traditional financial institutions had overwhelming power in their hands that were prone to corruption and abuse. There was no significant trend as to why respondents were concerned less about online privacy than the unfairness of their financial systems.

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