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Despite not being charged with a crime, Prosecutors with the U.S. Attorney’s Office seize man’s Bitcoin worth $35 million.

Despite not being charged with a crime, Prosecutors with the U.S. Attorney’s Office seize man’s Bitcoin worth $35 million.



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23 Comments

  1. Granpa spent 7 years in Federal prison and was never charged. Lawyer got’m out because the limit was reached. Went in because of the IRS, still hasn’t paid taxes since/in 30+ years.

  2. They really need to explain how they seized his coin. I feel like if the Feds came in to seize my BTC, they would not succeed. It would a great test to my security scheme!

  3. Meh….what the article says to me is ….that a bunch of FED agencies with a huge budget weren’t able to prove criminally that the Dude committed any crime (including money laundering or theft of the original IDs)….therefore they went through civil litigation to seize funds associated with the civil case. The Dude didn’t contest, so the FEDs win automatically and the judge issues the civil seizure notice, all banks and exchanges will comply. Physical cash (and HW wallets) are a bit trickier but if specifically mentioned (x dollars at this location) I think they are also fair game.
    Why didn’t the Dude contest?….the easy one would be why is the FED bringing civil suit? They aren’t the aggrieved party….
    Remember the OJ case…found not guilty of murder but found guilty in the subsequent civil case, because the threshold of guilt us much lower.

  4. Says the guy didn’t challenge the seizure. This means two things to me:

    1) he knows he’s fucking guilty
    2) he only gave them some of his money

    So, you make a deal to give them wallet A in exchange you don’t go to prison and you get to keep the rest of your wallets.

  5. Very weak reporting. The assumption is he was found guilty in a civil case(not criminal). The article does not state that one way or the other. We can thank these ‘civil cases’ on the idiots that let OJ walk free. The powers that be decided civil cases can be used when idiots don’t convict on the criminal charge. With that comes exploitation of that usage. As is in my opinion the situation here. They knew the guy was guilty but could not prove it so they used a bullshit method through a civil case to nail him anyway. My opinion.

  6. He may not have been charged with a criminal offence, but he is facing a civil lawsuit for fraud, for selling hacked account information on the dark web. Seems fair to me, the crypto is probably part of the evidence against him.

  7. “In this case, prosecutors say the suspect used so-called tumblers, which pool multiple transactions to launder one cryptocurrency for another. It is a technique known as ‘chain hopping,’ which authorities say is a violation of federal money laundering laws.”

    That’s right ladies and gentlemen! SHITCOINING IS A VIOLATION!

  8. It’s seems like reporters understand so little about bitcoin they never include the most basic information. It’s such an incomplete picture we have no idea what really happened

  9. This seems to be the normal routine in America. Cops raid someone, they seize all cash and anything worth a thing, and then there are no charges but they get to keep the stuff they stole UNLESS the citizen fights tooth and nail through the (fucking awful) US legal system for months and months at great expense.

    Sorry USA but you’re a fucking shitty country.

  10. The word “seized” in this post title misrepresents, like the FBI somehow circumvented Bitcoin’s security features.

    Should have read: “Accused fraudster surrendered $35 million in Bitcoin to FBI to avoid prison time”.

  11. Whether this guy is guilty or not doesn’t matter to me, it does point out that somehow we need to come up with a protocol that prevents anyone from seizing money.
    My hope with crypto currencies is that I will be able to purchase and protect my “money” against seizure by anyone (government or otherwise).
    I believe that government no longer should be involved in my accumulation and use of the fruits of my labor.
    I was hoping that cryptos would be this answer.

  12. The suspect, who was questioned by federal agents and whose Parkland home was searched, did not challenge the U.S. government’s move to take his cryptocurrency, according to court records.

    🤣😂

  13. The suspect, who was questioned by federal agents and whose Parkland home was searched, did not challenge the U.S. government’s move to take his cryptocurrency, according to court records.

    🤣😂

  14. He was charged with fraud in a civil case and lost. He was a scammer.

    Little misleading to say “wasn’t charged with a crime” but I guess /r/technicallythetruth

What do you think?

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