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Texas not only has the cheapest electricity in the U.S. but some of the cheapest in the globe. Apart from the lax regulations, Texas offers yet another crucial advantage to miners.

Texas not only has the cheapest electricity in the U.S. but some of the cheapest in the globe. Apart from the lax regulations, Texas offers yet another crucial advantage to miners.



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  1. tldr; Texas Governor Greg Abbott has reportedly made a virtual appearance at a crypto conference to convince miners to relocate to the state. The state has the cheapest electricity in the US but some of the cheapest in the globe, according to the Global Energy Institute. Texas may have captured most of the Chinese hash rate as it has a large share of energy coming from renewables.

    *This summary is auto generated by a bot and not meant to replace reading the original article. As always, DYOR.*

  2. https://www.electricchoice.com/electricity-prices-by-state/

    For electricity that you can *actually use* (IE electricity that is delivered to where your mining equipment is plugged in) Texas averages 11.36 per KWH delivered, not 8.58 cents.

    Typical clueless blogger trying to be a news source, but lacks enough sense to actually, oh I dunno, think to look up actual numbers themselves and then compare the numbers to their own electric bill to see if they are consistent.

    Gee, let’s take a politicians statement as fact, what could possibly go wrong with that?

    They (whoever came up with the 8.58 number) are probably using the generation rate, and not the combined wholesale plus distribution rate. Intentionally disingenuous or honest mistake? Well it IS a politician, but you can form your own opinion. By reference, my actual PA electric bills, taking the total bill $ amount and dividing by total KWH, runs around [edit for typo ~~11.25 – 11.50~~] 14.25 – 14.50 Which surprise surprise correlates with the numbers being reported by the people who make it their business to accurately report electric rates. Took me about 30 seconds google that. But I guess you have to be smart enough to be skeptical of BS numbers being printed in “blog as news” sources.

    11.36 is still cheap, but it’s only nominally cheaper (~10%) than the national average which is 12.55.

    Really cheap electric looks to be:

    * Louisiana (9.37)
    * Washington (9.79)
    * Arkansas (9.99)
    * Kentucky (10.56)
    * Idaho (10.58)
    * Utah (10.63)
    * Oklahoma (10.72)
    * Tennessee (10.79)
    * Oregon (11.02)

  3. This is complete garbage. For those that don’t know, Texas operates its own power grid that is outside the jurisdiction of the FERC. What this means is that prices (which, BTW, are not the lowest in the US) can fluctuate wildly and without cap. It is also largely separated from the other two grids in the US, which prevents it from selling electricity there during times of excess or buying during times of need. Moreover, this is a liability during emergencies and has left the state susceptible to rolling blackouts in the past. Also, deregulation has run rampant in Texas in an effort to increase profits for power companies. The result is that the grid is outdated and unreliable. A final note, the vast majority of the state’s power comes from fossil fuels and is only going to get more expensive in the future. A better place for cheap, renewable electricity would be somewhere like Washington state. In short, no, the power grid in Texas is not another crucial advantage to miners.

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