in

Who Controls Bitcoin Core?

Who Controls Bitcoin Core?



View Reddit by parakiteView Source

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

GIPHY App Key not set. Please check settings

5 Comments

  1. tldr; The question of who controls the ability to merge code changes into Bitcoin Core’s GitHub repository tends to come up on a recurring basis. Bitcoin Core is a focal point for development of the Bitcoin protocol rather than a point of command and control. Anyone is free to propose code changes to improve the software by opening a pull request.

    *This summary is auto generated by a bot and not meant to replace reading the original article. As always, DYOR.*

  2. > Bitcoin Core is a focal point for development of the Bitcoin protocol rather than a point of command and control.

    Agreed. Bitcoin Core is merely the conventional reference implementation. There are lots of other widely used implementations that seek to remain compatible with the “core reference”. Changes that potentially affect compatibility need to go through the BIP approval process.

    It is similar to the situation of gcc and clang being (superset) reference implementations for the C language while compatibility-affecting changes to the common core are meant to be approved by the ISO/IEC 9899 standardization committee.

    Still, it is network of running Bitcoin nodes that has the last word on whether they will agree to roll out the improvement or not.

    > Any number of GitHub employees could use their administrative privileges to inject code into the repository without consent from the maintainers.

    The Git commit journal is itself also blockchain, very similar to the one in Bitcoin. The attacker would have to inject a new commit at the end of one of the chains (“branches”).

    Doing that somewhere in the middle would make the hosted repository incompatible with the millions of copies around. It would look like a bug that corrupted the hosted copy. It wouldn’t even spread. Someone would first have to put back the previous version for the hosted copy to be even remotely useful.

    Injecting malware at the end of a chain would immediately trigger questions from the thousands of developers tracking the commit journal.

    It would not break the Bitcoin Core sources but rather the trust in GitHub. The ramifications would include tens of thousands of projects moving away from GitHub. In other words, that kind of event would break GitHub.

    The short story: The Git commit chain is itself a public blockchain, pretty much as impossible to corrupt as the Bitcoin blockchain.

    Therefore, the attack described in the article, cannot succeed.

What do you think?

BitTorrent Announces First Three Winners Leading Up to 10M BTT Grand Prize

BitTorrent Announces First Three Winners Leading Up to 10M BTT Grand Prize

Cardano ($ADA) Powered Smart Contract Based Marketplace Goes Live

Cardano ($ADA) Powered Smart Contract Based Marketplace Goes Live